Humanities

Humanities I, History and English address the same topics as the corresponding college-prep courses described below. However, they focus on skills and approach the content in a more thematic style. Hands-on work, accessibility of texts, and adjusted pace are important elements of the Humanities I course. (1 credit for each course)

Humanities I College Prep, History and English explores world history focusing primarily on important events from prehistory to the Reformation. In addition, students learn about world geography and current events as they connect thematically to course topics. Similarly, English students learn about major literary works from prehistoric stories to Shakespeare in Elizabethan England. History, religion, geography, literature, art, music, architecture, government, and technology are integrated throughout both courses. Students continue to develop reading, writing, speaking, research, analysis, study and citizenship skills. (1 credit for each course)

Humanities I Honors, History and English begins to prepare students for Advanced Placement© (AP) courses offered in their junior year. Students enrolled in Honors should have self-discipline, solid academic skills and habits, and be intrinsically motivated to study and learn. The instructors expect above average ability and maturity from Honors students so they will move through curriculum faster and expect more self-directed pupils. Students can expect extensive reading assignments and a focus on essay writing. Prerequisite: academic contract with instructor, writing and reading proficiency (formally evaluated), teacher recommendations, evidence of academic success (grades) and on-going evidence of scholarly habits. (1 credit for each course)

Humanities II, History and English is organized thematically and includes history, literature, art, music and architecture of 20th century United States. Students continue to develop reading, writing, speaking, research, study, analysis and citizenship skills. (1 credit for each course)

Humanities II College Prep, History and English explores U.S. culture from the Spanish American War to the present. American history, literature, art, and music will be integrated throughout the course. Students will write expository essays and practice the fundamentals of research. They will continue to develop reading, writing, speaking, analysis, and study skills. (1 credit for each course)

Humanities II Honors, History and English prepares students for Advanced Placement© courses offered in the junior year. Students enrolled in Honors should have self-discipline, solid academic skills and habits, and be intrinsically motivated to study and learn. The instructors expect above average ability and maturity from Honors students, so they will move through curriculum faster and expect more self-directed pupils. Students can expect extensive reading assignments and a focus on essay writing. Prerequisite: academic contract with instructor, writing and reading proficiency (formally evaluated), teacher recommendations, evidence of academic success (grades) and on-going evidence of scholarly habits. (1 credit for each course)

Humanities III, History and English explores American civilization and United States history from pre-European contact through the 19th Century. History, literature, art, architecture, and music are integrated throughout the curriculum. Students research and present a major paper in this class. Writing, reading, analysis, group work, and presentations are emphasized. (1 credit for each course)

Humanities III College Prep, History and English explores American civilization and United States history from pre-European contact through the 19th Century. American history, literature, art, architecture, and some music will be integrated throughout the course. Students will research and present a major paper. Writing, reading, analysis, discussion, and presentations will be emphasized. (1 credit for each course)

Humanities III, AP US History and Advanced Placement© English Language and Composition explores American history from pre-European contact to the end of the twentieth century. Rhetoric and history will be integrated throughout this college-level course. Argumentation, synthesis and analysis of non-fiction are emphasized in this course. There will be frequent writing assessments and demanding homework expectations. Students will research, write, and orally present a major paper. Writing, reading, analysis, and discussion are emphasized. This course is taught as a seminar, which requires much independent work. All students are required to take both AP exams. Prerequisite: academic contract with instructor, writing and reading proficiency (formally evaluated), teacher recommendations, evidence of academic success (grades) and on-going evidence of scholarly habits. (1 credit for each course)

Humanities Vocational English is designed for students who will enter the workforce directly after high school. Students investigate viable career paths, prepare resumes, practice writing job application cover letters, and develop job search and interview skills. Current events, reading, writing, mechanics and communications skills practice are ongoing as it pertains to success in the workforce. Each student initiates, develops, implements and presents a senior project during the fourth quarter. (1 credit)

Humanities IV College Prep, History and English is for students intending to further their education after high school, with the goal of promoting self-discovery, active citizenship, and global awareness. Students study world culture from 1850 to the present. Contemporary issues, history, philosophy, religion, literature, art, and music are integrated throughout the course. Analysis, synthesis, and communication skills are emphasized. Students read, write, discuss, and debate. They work independently and collaborate on layered projects. Each student initiates, develops, implements and presents a senior project during the fourth quarter. (1 credit for each course)

Advanced Placement© English Literature and Composition is a college-level literature course that emphasizes understanding and analysis of imaginative writing, the college essay, and senior project. Students read and write frequent lengthy works. Students are required to remain in the course until they take the AP® test. Prerequisite: academic contract with instructor, writing and reading proficiency (formally evaluated), teacher recommendations, evidence of academic success (grades) and on-going evidence of scholarly habits. (1 credit)

Advanced Placement© U.S. Government and Politics provides an analytical perspective on government and politics in the United States. This course involves both the study of general concepts used to interpret U.S. politics and the analysis of specific case studies. It also requires familiarity with the various institutions, groups, beliefs, and ideas that constitute U.S. political reality (AP® website). This course is recommended for 11th and 12th graders. Prerequisite: academic contract with instructor, writing and reading proficiency (formally evaluated), teacher recommendations, evidence of academic success (grades) and on-going evidence of scholarly habits. (1 credit)

 

Humanities Electives

Creative Writing explores several different forms of creative writing. Topics include poetry, short fiction, creative nonfiction, mixed genre, drama, and digital creative writing. Students also take part in the writing workshop process, where they work with their peers to critique and review their writing. (1/2 credit)

Credit Recovery English is designed to meet the needs of students who did not secure a credit for English during previous semesters of high school study. Half credits in General English are awarded to students who maintain a passing grade throughout one semester. Curriculum will be tailored to meet the needs of each student. This course requires teacher and academic counselor permission. (1/2 credit)

Global Issues and Model United Nations examines social, political, scientific, and economic issues and how they influence decision making on the global stage. Students explore multiple perspectives on these diverse topics in order to generate solutions. Throughout the semester, students cultivate research, writing, debate, and collaboration skills. This course also serves as a preparatory time for the school’s Model UN team, which competes at a conference in the spring. (Spring semester only: 1/2 credit)

Psychology is a discussion-based course in which students learn many psychological theories and terms and use them to analyze current events, life, and film. Most work for the course are done in class. This class is intended to give students a deep understanding of human motivations and behavior. This course is intended for juniors and seniors. (1/2 credit)

College Preparatory Psychology is a discussion-based course in which students learn many psychological terms and theories and use them to analyze current events, life, and film. While much of work for the course will be done in class, students will also write two formal film analysis papers which count for a significant portion of final grades. These papers are intended to prepare students for the rigors of college courses. This course is intended for juniors and seniors. (1/2 credit)

Dual Enrollment Psychology enables students to earn college credit from the University of Maine at Fort Kent. DE psychology is very similar to CP psychology with the addition of weekly vocabulary quizzes and a more rigorous exam. As with the other psychology courses at MCI, students can expect to gain a deep understanding of human behavior and motivation. This course is intended for seniors. This course is a partnership with the University of Maine at Fort Kent and carries a cost of approximately $100 for Maine students. (Cost is approximately $430 for non-Maine students). Students will receive three college credits upon successful completion. (Three credits from UMFK and 1/2 credit from MCI)

Sociology combines an introduction to sociology with the study of crime and social psychology. The course is discussion based, with students leading discussions as often as possible. Students use social theory to analyze their lives, society, current events and film. Most of the work for this course is done in class. This class is intended for juniors and seniors. (1/2 credit)

College Preparatory Sociology combines an introduction to sociology with the study of deviance and social psychology. This course is also discussion based, with students leading discussions as often as possible. Students use social theory to analyze their lives, society, current events and film. While much of the work for this course is done in class, students also write two formal film analysis papers. These papers count for a large percentage of final grades and are intended to better prepare students for the rigors of college classes. This class is intended for juniors and seniors. (1/2 credit)

Dual Enrollment Sociology enables students to earn college credit from the University of Maine at Fort Kent by taking this course. Similar to CP Sociology, DE Sociology also covers an introduction to sociology with an emphasis on deviance and social control. Again, this course is discussion based, with students learning how to analyze current events and film. In addition to in-class credit from discussions and two formal papers, Dual Enrollment students also take weekly vocabulary quizzes and have a more rigorous final exam. This course is intended for seniors. This course is a partnership with the University of Maine at Fort Kent and carries a cost of approximately $100 for Maine students. (Cost is approximately $430 for non-Maine students). Students will receive three college credits upon successful completion. (3 credits from UMFK and 1/2 credit from MCI)

Sports and Society is semester-long elective course looks at sports using sociological skills to understand how sports are a microcosm of a greater society. Students also look at the impact sports has had on different groups and vice versa. This course covers world sporting topics such as the Olympics and World Cup along with more North American topics such as high school football and Little League. Issues of race, gender, ethics, and economics as they relate to sports will also be looked at. (1/2 credit)

Visual Culture: Film Studies I & II encourages students to explore films as texts. As a medium of presentation, films convey narrative and employ many of the same elements of literature and art in a beautiful combination that is enhanced by the dramatic performance and functional form and style. The artistic construction can be appreciated along the lines of its individual elements as well as its original medium. This course will involve various activities to explore film techniques and analysis of films, create original films, and enjoy watching films as a classroom community. Students completing the first course may opt to continue their study in Visual Culture: Film Studies II. (1/2 credit)

Young Adult Literature is semester-long course that samples several books in the young adult literature genre. Students read these novels by theme, in different formats: as a class, in small groups and individually. Reading, writing, collaboration, discussion and technology are emphasized. This course is ideal for 9th and 10th graders but open to anyone who loves to read. (1/2 credit)

Economics is a comprehensive introductory course to economic concepts and skills that students need in today's environment. Economics offers study of major concepts behind both microeconomics, the study of effects of personal decisions about money, and macroeconomics, which examines general economic factors, like interest rates, taxes, and productivity. This course is open to juniors and seniors only and will be in the fall semester. (1/2 credit)

Personal Finance is focused on the financial literacy of the individual, preparing people for basic life events such as finding and applying for a job, managing a budget, buying a house, and planning for retirement. Students focus on factors that go into deciding on careers, managing household finances (paying for rent, mortgages, managing debt, etc.), and buying and selling assets such as stocks and bonds. We also dedicate a portion of the class to paying for college. This course is open to sophomores, juniors and seniors and will only require very basic math skills. It is offered in the spring semester. (1/2 credit)

Introduction to Journalism and Publishing will result in a school newspaper/video news program in which students can investigate, record, and disseminate information about the school, on-campus people or events of interest, and local community news. Students collaborate with other students and adults frequently, they learn professional writing skills, source evaluation and crediting, and web publishing and/or video creation and editing. (1/2 credit)